The Necessary Hypocrisy of Torture

The Necessary Hypocrisy of Torture

Avner Mandelman says hypocrisy is necessary for a civilized society and there’s a need for some “necessary evil” to be performed if society is to survive. That goes for torture as well.

Send Development Aid to North Africa, Not Drones

Send Development Aid to North Africa, Not Drones

UN expert Katrin Park argues that swarming the impoverished northwest corner of Africa with $5 billion of counterterrorism assistance will not solve the region’s security threats.

Time for another ‘Sunni Awakening’ in Iraq

Time for another ‘Sunni Awakening’ in Iraq

Gen. (Ret.) Mohammed al-Samarae argues that a new ‘Sunni Awakening’ would help push ISIS out of Iraq, but U.S. needs to press Baghdad to grant the Sunnis meaningful gains–something the Maliki government refused to do.

With Russia, Eyeball to Eyeball Again

With Russia, Eyeball to Eyeball Again

Chris Miller argues Vladimir Putin is following Khrushchev’s “surface tension” strategy in Ukraine, bringing Washington and Moscow “eyeball to eyeball” again. But so far, the West is doing the blinking.

A Witness to Britain’s War Crimes in Kenya

A Witness to Britain’s War Crimes in Kenya

Huw Bennett, author of ‘Fighting the Mau Mau’, talks about the British COIN experience in 1950s Kenya and being called as a historian and expert witness in the landmark legal case brought by Mau Mau victims against the UK government.

Why a War of Attrition Favors Us, Not ISIS

Why a War of Attrition Favors Us, Not ISIS

Col. S. Clinton Hinote argues that by occupying territory and grabbing the world’s attention ISIS has also made itself vulnerable to attack, something the U.S. and its partners should take advantage of now.

It Takes A Massacre to Save a Village

It Takes A Massacre to Save a Village

Lionel Beehner ponders the inconsistent and indifferent reaction of the American public to massacres, genocide, and mass violence in places like Syria and Iraq and closer to home in Newtown, Aurora, and inner-city Chicago.

For Refugees in Turkey, A Tipping Point Looms

For Refugees in Turkey, A Tipping Point Looms

Known for its hospitality, Turkey opened its borders to all Syrians fleeing the fighting. Now the refugee crisis may be hitting a tipping point, writes Melissa Harrison.

In Iraq, A Faustian Bargain Awaits

In Iraq, A Faustian Bargain Awaits

Christian Cooper believes America should broker a deal with Iran to confront ISIS and ease the transition of Iraq into three autonomous regions, rather than await a violent disintegration.

For the Future Force, More is Not Always Better

For the Future Force, More is Not Always Better

Former U.S. Air Force strategic planner Eric Jorgensen argues that for the U.S. military, more is not always better, and decisions should be based on what we need, not on what we want.

For Russia, Death by a Thousand Aid Convoys

For Russia, Death by a Thousand Aid Convoys

As Russia rolls out aid convoys and the same R2P rhetoric it did before its 2008 invasion of Georgia, Lionel Beehner warns that the West must be clear in its support for Kiev.

Is Extremist Hip Hop Helping ISIS?

Is Extremist Hip Hop Helping ISIS?

Upon news that the ISIS slayer of James Foley may be a British hip hop DJ, Hisham Aidi writes that European hip hop is not new to jihadism.

How to Found a New Iraq From Embers of War

How to Found a New Iraq From Embers of War

Kevin Russell writes that Iraq’s leaders, like Lincoln after the American Civil War, will need military progress and de-escalation to create space for political action.

Let Iran and ISIS Fight It Out

Let Iran and ISIS Fight It Out

To avoid nuclear proliferation in the region, the United States should stay out of Iraq and let Iran’s proxies and ISIS fight it out, argues Lt Col. Paul Darling.

Military Force Structure Math–the American Way

Military Force Structure Math–the American Way

There are many ways to restructure our armed forces to match current budgetary conditions. Finding the right balance between risks and benefits poses challenges for policymakers, writes Eric Jorgensen.

Why ISIS is More Dangerous than Al-Qaeda

Why ISIS is More Dangerous than Al-Qaeda

Unlike al-Qaeda, ISIS has a true sanctuary in the heart of the Arab world. That is why the U.S. is right to intervene in Iraq, writes Colonel Clint Hinote.

Time to Retire GWOT Mindset in Africa

Time to Retire GWOT Mindset in Africa

In Africa, America is again in search of amorphous monsters to slay. But this GWOT mindset has not made us, or Africans, any safer, writes Thomas Lansner.

What the Air Force Can Learn from FedEx

What the Air Force Can Learn from FedEx

To reform the Air Force amid budget constraints, it needs to look more like Corporate America. FedEx offers a nice model, writes Eric Jorgensen.

Joshua Rovner on Iraq and the Politics of Intelligence

Joshua Rovner on Iraq and the Politics of Intelligence

Joshua Rovner of Southern Methodist University talks about his book, Fixing the Facts, on the intelligence-policy relationship and “politicization” of intelligence during the Iraq War and throughout U.S. history.

The Future of America’s All-Volunteer Force

The Future of America’s All-Volunteer Force

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Darling argues that the U.S. military must rethink its dated benefits system and how it attracts troops and structures their benefits in order to meet the nation’s fiscal challenges today.

Prelude to Another Russian Missile Crisis

Prelude to Another Russian Missile Crisis

As the world finds itself concerned with Russian missiles once again, Chris Miller revisits SNIE 85-3-62, the crucial–and wrong–U.S. intelligence estimate that Nikita Khrushchev would not place nuclear missiles on Cuba.

A Cure For America’s ‘Iraq Syndrome’

A Cure For America’s ‘Iraq Syndrome’

When it comes to the use of force, America cannot let bad decisions in Iraq stand in the way of decisionmaking in Syria, Ukraine and other conflicts today, especially if it wants to tackle obstacles in the larger strategic environment and pivot to the East.

Ahron Bregman on Gaza, Israel, and Palestine

Ahron Bregman on Gaza, Israel, and Palestine

Ahron Bregman talks about his latest book, Cursed Victory, on the history of conflict in Israel, Palestine, Gaza and the occupied territories, drawing on high-level sources and interviews revealed for the first time.

Germany-U.S. Spy Scandal: Typewriters & Intelligence

Germany-U.S. Spy Scandal: Typewriters & Intelligence

Chris Miller on the latest German-American spying scandal and why Berlin and Moscow considering going back to paper shuffling and typewriters to counter electronic intelligence gathering may not be as crazy as it sounds.

Getting Behind ‘Hybrid’ Warfare

Getting Behind ‘Hybrid’ Warfare

For today’s superpowers, strength in the art of hybrid warfare is found not on the front lines but on the fringe of international law and the grey regions of international policy, writes Jordan Bravin.

Revisiting COIN Strategies in Vietnam

Revisiting COIN Strategies in Vietnam

Chris Miller investigates which COIN strategies worked in Vietnam and why, providing valuable lessons for U.S. efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Kristan Stoddart on U.S.-NATO Nuclear Policy

Kristan Stoddart on U.S.-NATO Nuclear Policy

In an interview on his detailed new book, The Sword and the Shield, Kristan Stoddart talks about the U.S., Britain, and NATO nuclear policy and cooperation and how cyberwarfare may be the new Cold War.

Cold War Lessons for Counterintelligence Today

Cold War Lessons for Counterintelligence Today

Following Edward Snowden’s NSA disclosures and renewed clashes between Washington and Berlin over espionage, Chris Miller discusses Cold War lessons in counterintelligence still applicable to national security challenges today.

The ‘Hot’ War in Cold War Southeast Asia

The ‘Hot’ War in Cold War Southeast Asia

The dominant narrative of the Cold War focuses on the conflict in the West between Washington and Moscow, forgetting about the lessons learned in the “hot” war in Southeast Asia. These lessons are worth another look, argues Chris Miller.

Ian Morris on Why War Is ‘Sometimes Good’

Ian Morris on Why War Is ‘Sometimes Good’

In his provocative new book, War! What is It Good For?, Ian Morris discusses the Hobbesian role of the leviathan in reducing violence and why war is “sometimes good.”

‘The Troubles

‘The Troubles': COIN Tactics Against the IRA

John Wood argues looking at the “criminalization” of IRA terrorist violence during The Troubles may shed new light on COIN tactics in ethnic and sectarian conflicts in the 21st century.

The Myth of Obama’s Realism

The Myth of Obama’s Realism

Why do polls show Obama’s approval on foreign policy at record lows? Hint: It’s not because he is a realist, Lionel Beehner explains.

Why Urban Warfare Studies Still Matter

Why Urban Warfare Studies Still Matter

Peter Storey makes the case that the rise and fall of urban warfare studies should not mean we turn away from the literature, especially given that our planet is becoming more urbanized.

Two Views of Intelligence

Two Views of Intelligence

Chris Miller breaks down two philosophical approaches to intelligence analysis, but finds that the practice is still “informed guesswork.”

Just Killers, Moral Injuries

Just Killers, Moral Injuries

Robert Emmet Meagher writes that “just war” doctrine explains our inability to comprehend moral injury and to make sense of our military “heroes” marching off to take their own lives.

The Fading Memory of War in Congress

The Fading Memory of War in Congress

As the last of our World War II veterans leave Congress, the risk of losing the memory and lessons learned during a time of unparalleled global warfare is both present and real, argues Jordan Bravin.

Russia’s Fair Energy Friends

Russia’s Fair Energy Friends

For Russia, energy policy equals foreign policy. But the few pliant friends Russia has, writes Zoran Tihomirovic, could turn their back on Moscow if its energy becomes too expensive, financially or politically.

Moral Injury and Military Suicide

Moral Injury and Military Suicide

The second of a two-part feature, Lt. Col. Douglas A. Pryer examines the effects of moral injury on military culture and military suicide.

Moral Injury and the American Soldier

Moral Injury and the American Soldier

Lt. Col. Douglas A. Pryer, looking back at classical literature and his own experience in Iraq, makes the case that “moral injury” better explains some psychological symptoms than PTSD. This is the first of a two-part essay.

Russia’s NATO Expansion Myth

Russia’s NATO Expansion Myth

Chris Miller argues that Russia’s claim that NATO verbally agreed never to expand in the 1990s is nonsense. If NATO expansion was as vital an issue to Russia then as is claimed today, Moscow would have insisted on a clear statement of it in writing.

Morten Ender on Millennials and the Military

Morten Ender on Millennials and the Military

Morten G. Ender, coauthor of a new book that examines millennials’ attitudes on the military, says he is optimistic about future generations’ views on war and argues there is a narrowing of the civilian-military gap in this country.

How Many Fingers in the Warthog Pie?

How Many Fingers in the Warthog Pie?

The axing of an aging, likely strategically inconsequential aircraft like the A-10 ‘Warthog’ is a small price to pay in order to maintain top-flight armed forces for America’s future, argues Jonathan Miller.

What a ‘Head Strong’ Military Looks Like

What a ‘Head Strong’ Military Looks Like

Mike Matthews writes in a new book that “moral trauma” and PTSD are occupational hazards of combat, but that military personnel tend to be resilient. His research suggests that psychological wounds may be as medal-worthy as physical ones.

Ireland 1916-1921: The War COIN Theorists Forgot

Ireland 1916-1921: The War COIN Theorists Forgot

COIN theorists tend to hold up the British as exemplar counterinsurgents because of their successful operation in Malaya. But Peter Storey writes that operations in Ireland from 1916 to 1921 should receive greater attention from military historians.

Newsletter

Cicero on Facebook

Calendar

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Print

1 Comment

Post a comment
  1. Johnf305 says:

    Keep working ,impressive job!

Leave a Reply

Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS